Squash (2012) – Short Film / Cortomejadre

In Spanish. Click on video “Subtitles / Closed Captions” button for English subtitles.

It seems that, in modern times, destiny has reserved the same meeting place for us: the dole queue. A squash-themed story of competition, unemployment and dairy produce.

Parece que, con los tiempos que corren, el destino nos tiene guardado a todos un mismo lugar de encuentro: la cola del paro.

Distributed by the Instituto Del Cine, Spain 2012
  • Written and Directed by Jon Plazaola and Javier Cirujeda
  • Lead Producer: Guillermo Tio
  • Original Idea: Jon Plazaola
  • Associate Producer: Helher Escribano
  • Executive Producers: Guillermo Tio, Jon Plazaola and Javier Cirujeda
  • Director of Photography: Marco Caneda
  • Artistic Director: Carlos Perez De Irube
  • Music: The Dead Rocks “Easy Job”

How To Win A Squash Rally – Part 3

Hot on the heels of “How To Win A Squash Rally” and “How To Win A Squash Rally – Part 2” comes this offering from Mexico’s César Salazar. Well, perhaps “hot on the heels” is a little misleading as the two aforementioned posts appeared on this blog in 2016.

Salazar’s effort came in a first-round match against Number 2 seed Karim Abdel Gawad in the 2017 Hong Kong Open. The Mexican’s strategy can be summarised as follows:

1. Wrongly try to second-guess the direction of your opponent’s next shot and dive forward, full length, to return the ball.
2. Get to your feet.
3. Fall over your opponent’s leg and launch yourself horizontally towards the right-hand wall to return the ball.
4. Get up again.
5. Repeat step 1.
6. Return opponent’s next shot from a kneeling position.
7. Regain your footing.
8. Watch your opponent put the ball into the tin.

Classic.

Salazar went on to lose the match 3-1 to Gawad who eventually reached the semi-finals, going out to fellow Egyptian Ali Farag who, one assumes, upset Gawad’s rhythm by remaining on his feet through the entire 55 minute encounter.

It’s amazing what some players will do to win a rally.

Sources

Thanks to PSA Squash TV for the clip. You can find their YouTube channel here.

Monday Night (2011) – Short Film

A short film about appalling behaviour.

Cast

Larry Day and Bruce Dinsmore as The Players

Credits

A film by Karl Raudsapp-Hearne

Funded by Bravo! FACT

Presented by Pulsing Calf Pictures

Written, Directed and Produced by Karl R. Hearne

****

“Monday Night” isn’t the first squash-themed short film to serve as a cypher for dubious behaviour in business and, I suspect, it won’t be the last. As a case in point, French director Lionel Bailliu’s 2003 film Squash showed two business rivals involved in on-court combat of the “fight to the death” variety.

In contrast, Karl Raudsapp-Hearne’s 2011 film contrasts on-court etiquette (or lack of it in the case of Larry Day’s self-destructive player) with off-court subterfuge, both opponents happy to plot against a new colleague to further their own financial ends.

“I guess that’s the game,” says Day’s character at the death.

For some players, I suspect that’s just what it is.

 

 

The Cannonball Run

Having written recently of the domination of Egyptian and, more specifically, Alexandrian players in the men’s and women’s games, I was, in retrospect, cruising for a bruising.

True, the appearance of Alexandria’s Mohamed El Shorbagy and Cairo’s Tarek Momen in the March final of The Canary Wharf Classic in London followed the pattern I’d written about, El Shorbagy winning in a five-game thriller. The final of the Grasshopper Cup in Zurich later in the month (see below) also featured an Alexandria / Cairo pairing with El Shorbagy taking on, and losing to, a revitalised Ramy Ashour.

Even the El Gouna International tournament in April went to form, Alexandrians Marwan El Shorbagy and Raneem El Welily taking the men’s and women’s titles defeating Cairo’s Ali Farag and Alexandrian Noor El Sherbini respectively.

No change there.

The pattern repeated in May where El Sherbini and El Welily met again, this time in the final of the Allam British Open in Hull. On this occasion, El Sherbini was to reverse the El Gouna result, beating  El Welily in three games.

And so to the men’s final.

If, from an Egyptian point of view, Simon Rosner had proved to be the party-pooper by winning January’s Tournament of Champions in New York, Colombia’s Miguel Ángel Rodríguez was to make a similar impact in Hull (see below). In another five-game epic, the “Colombian Cannonball” maintained his high-energy form over 100 minutes to upset two time winner Mohamed El Shorbagy.

Despite Rodriguez’s heroics, however, Egyptian players still took eleven out of the twelve finalist spots in the four world-ranking tournaments held from March to May.

After all, cannonballs don’t always show up on finals day.

Sources

Thanks to the PSA Squash TV Channel.

 

 

James Willstrop: Treading The Boards

Time for some quick-fire questions for all you squash lovers.

(1) What links Bill Paterson, Richard Dreyfuss and James Willstrop?

No? OK, here’s an easier one.

(2) What links Colin Firth, Tom Hiddlestone and James Willstrop?

Can’t get that one either? Oh, dear. How about:

(3) What links Laurence Olivier, James Norton and James Willstrop?

Well, yes, I suppose that most of you spotted that recently-crowned Commonwealth Men’s Singles Squash Champion James Willstrop is mentioned in all three questions. But, then, that wasn’t the question was it?

So here are the answers:

(1) All have played the role of prominent lawyer Gerardo Escobar in Ariel Dorfman’s play “Death and The Maiden.”

(2) All have played the role of former pilot Freddie Page in Terence Rattigan’s play “The Deep Blue Sea.”

(3) All have played the role of British Army commander Captain Stanhope in R.C. Sherriff’s play “Journey’s End.”

In short, professional squash player James Willstrop is also a dramatic actor.

Death and The Maiden

Those of you wanting to catch James treading the boards will be able to do so next month (June 2018) at the Harrogate Dramatic Society where he appears in a new production of “Death and The Maiden.”

James Willstrop and Clare Evans-Argent in “Death and The Maiden”

Premiered in 1991, the play is a three-hander set in an unnamed South American country in which a new, democratic age is dawning. Housewife Paulina Escobar’s husband, Gerardo (James Willstrop), brings home a charming stranger he has found stranded on the road. Paulina (played by Clare Evans-Argent) becomes convinced that the stranger, Dr.Miranda, was part of the old regime and that he tortured and raped her for weeks while she was blindfolded. She takes Miranda captive to determine the truth despite attempts by both her husband and Miranda to convince her that Miranda is innocent.

Ariel Dorfman’s explosively provocative, award-winning play was written in the wake of the Pinochet regime in Chile and continues to resonate with modern audiences as a stark reminder of the human rights violations we continue to witness in the world today.

The Deep Blue Sea

James Willstrop’s dramatic role in “Death and The Maiden” follows his well-received 2017 performance in ”The Deep Blue Sea” at the Ilkley Playhouse. Described as “an extraordinary exploration of love, desire, delusion and despair,” the play takes place over the course of one day.

James Willstrop and Louise Button in “The Deep Blue Sea”

First performed in 1952, it begins with the discovery of Hester Collyer (Louise Button) in her flat by her neighbours after she has failed in an attempt to commit suicide by gassing herself. In flashback, some time before, Hester left her husband, Sir William Collyer, a respectable High Court judge, for a semi-alcoholic former RAF pilot, Freddie Page (James Willstrop). Hester’s relationship with Page was physical and passionate, but his ardour eventually cooled, leaving her emotionally stranded and desperate.

The part of Freddie was “played with great languid nonchalance by James Willstrop” reported the Ilkley News in 2017.

Journey’s End

James Willstrop in “Journey’s End”

Last, but not least, Willstrop’s role in “The Deep Blue Sea” was preceded, in 2015, by a performance for which he received a best actor award at the Wharfedale Festival of Theatre. His role as Stanhope in the Adel Players production of “Journey’s End” was “particularly demanding as it required him to be on stage for almost all of the play” said one review. First performed in 1928 at the Apollo Theatre in London the role of Stanhope was played by the young Laurence Olivier.

Set in the trenches near Saint-Quentin, Aisne, in 1918 towards the end of the First World War, “Journey’s End” gives a glimpse into the experiences of the officers of a British Army infantry company in World War I. The entire story plays out in the officers’ dugout over four days from 18 March 1918 to 21 March 1918, during the run-up to the real-life events of Operation Michael, a major German military offensive during the First World War that began the Spring Offensive on 21 March 1918.

The Acting Game

In addition to his acting career, Willstrop has carved a niche for himself as a theatre critic with reviews of plays in London’s West End as well as in the North of England. In one, he compares the roles of actor and sportsman:

“The acting game does differ from sport in that it is all subjectivity. In sport, you are either good or not. Rankings or titles tend not to lie.”

Sources

Thanks to Wikipedia, PSA World Tour, Harrogate Advertiser, Keighley News, The Adel Players and The Huffington Post.

 

 

Squash: Inner Toddler (Radio Sketch)

As a fan of British comedy writer and actor John Finnemore (check out his “Cabin Pressure” series), stumbling upon this two-minute sketch from a recent BBC radio broadcast was a pleasant surprise.

The on-court sound effects provide the background for a conversation between the players which moves from portentous business-speak to child-parent dialogue, finishing with bloke-ish bravado.

Now, that’s what I call cheeky.

Sources

Thanks to the BBC for posting this clip from “John Finnemore’s Souvenir Programme.” You can find out more about John Finnemore from his Wikipedia entry and his highly entertaining blog.

Note

Before finding fame as television’s “Sherlock“, British actor Benedict Cumberbatch had already acquired a sizeable following through his role as Captain Martin Crieff in John Finnemore’s radio comedy series “Cabin Pressure.”

Women’s Squash And The House Of Saud

By any account, 2018 is shaping up to be a ground-breaking year for women, sport and road transport in Saudi Arabia. In early January women were, for the first time ever, allowed to attend (men’s) professional football matches albeit accompanied by their male chaperones and confined to segregated seating areas. This revolutionary relaxation of The Kingdom’s strict laws followed last year’s announcement that, from June 2018, women would, also for the first time, be allowed to drive cars thus raising the possibility of increased female car ownership, demand for driving lessons, congestion on Saudi roads, attendances at Saudi football matches and development of sports stadiums to cater for dedicated toilet and refreshment facilities for women.

Later in January, women spectators were similarly let loose in Riyadh’s Princess Nora bint Abdul Rahman University to watch the first PSA world series squash tournament for women to be held in Saudi Arabia. And that’s not all. Not only did the tournament attract many of the world’s best players but, in a symbolic move, a last-32 wildcard entry was granted to The Kingdom’s highest-ranked player, Nada Abo Al Naja, who thus became the first Saudi woman to play in a world series PSA event. Al Naja went out of the competition, losing to number 2 seed Camille Serme of France.

Saudi PSA Women’s Squash Masters Finalists 2018

The tournament, originally scheduled to take place in November 2017, was held with Saudi Arabia in the throes of internal reforms introduced by Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman including the lifting of restrictions on the activities of women. With total prize money of US$165,000 up for grabs, the tournament was won by World number 1 Nour El Sherbini of Egypt who defeated her compatriot Raneem El Weleily 3-0.

Footnote

As a matter of interest (well, it is to me anyway) Saudi Arabia is the only country in the world in which I have a 100% record of squash success having played and won two matches there. The matches were both played on a court at the Intercontinental Hotel in Riyadh (where I was staying) against fellow hotel guests, both of whom were travelling with their racquets in the hope of bumming a match with anyone they could find.

So, the next time you’re visiting Riyadh…

Sources

Thanks to Arab News, The Times of Saudia and TheSports.org.

 

The Alexandria Quartet

Following, as I do, the progress of PSA tournaments, one can’t help but notice certain patterns. One such pattern, namely the appearance of Egyptian players in world ranking tournament finals, hardly needs mention. But the background of those players also lends itself to some interesting statistics.

Not surprisingly, most of Egypt’s top players originate mainly from the capital, Cairo, and the country’s second largest city, Alexandria. So, how have world ranked players from the two cities fared over recent months?

I decided to find out and looked at the results from 10 world ranking tournament finals (5 men’s and 5 women’s) over the last 4 months, namely:

The Tournament of Champions (January 2018)

The Saudi Women’s Masters (January 2018)

The World Championships (December 2017)

The Hong Kong Open (November 2017)

The Qatar Classic (October 2017)

The US Open (October 2017)

Of the 20 finalist places, 19 were filled by Egyptian players and just one by a non-Egyptian, Germany’s Simon Rosner, Winner of the Tournament of Champions in New York. Of the 19 places occupied by Egyptians, 6 were taken by 3 players from Cairo with 13 being taken by 4 players hailing from Alexandria. The ‘Alexandria quartet’ won 7 tournaments and was runner up in 6 while the ‘Cairo trio’ won 2 and was runner-up in 4.

The Alexandria quartet, as you may have guessed, comprises: current women’s world Nos.1 and 2, Nour El Sherbini and Raneem El Welily respectively; and current men’s world No. 2 Mohamed El Shorbagy together with his older brother (and world No.4), Marwan. Of the four, only Marwan El Shorbagy has failed to win at least one tournament, his defeat in the final of The World Championships (at the hands of his brother) being his only contribution to the quartet’s finalist haul (see below.)

The Cairo trio comprises: current women’s world No.3, Nour El Tayeb, men’s world No.3, Ali Farag, and world No.7, Tarek Momen. At the US Open, El Tayeb and Farag had the distinction of becoming the first married couple to win their tournaments  at the same world-ranked event.

As I write, the Windy City Open in Chicago has reached the semi-final stage. Three of the Alexandria quartet, the El Shorbagy brothers and Raneem El Welily, are still in contention, the latter having beaten the fourth member, Nour El Sherbini, in their quarter-final match (see below.) All three of the Cairo trio are also through.

I make that 6 semi-finalists out of 8.

If I didn’t know any better, I’d say that history has a 75% chance of repeating itself. But then, statistics has never been my strong point.

Sources

Thanks to PSA World Tour.

Squash and the Syrian Girls

Hot on the heels of news that Serbia’s Cricket Federation has established a government-sponsored programme to encourage migrants and refugees to play cricket, comes an equally inspiring story from the world of squash.

The source of the story is the Kingdom of Jordan which, by early 2017, had seen over 650,000 Syrian refugees seeking shelter from the civil war raging in their country.

In 2016, US charity Reclaim Childhood, in partnership with the Jordan Squash Federation, announced an initiative to introduce Syrian girl refugees to squash. Fast forward a year and fifteen girls are now playing the sport coached by some of Jordan’s top-ranked players.

One of them is eleven-year-old Raghda Hasriyeh who practices with two of her sisters in the Jordanian capital of Amman and now dreams of a career in squash. Her father, Nizar Hasriyeh, says: “I don’t understand anything about this sport but I am so happy to see my three daughters playing squash. I hope to see them become world champions one day.”

Raghda Hasriyeh

With its costly rackets and purpose-built courts, squash might not seem an obvious choice for children displaced from Syria. But Reclaim Childhood says that getting the refugee girls involved in the sport can be invaluable in helping them deal with the hardships they face.

Life for Syrian refugees in Jordan is difficult but the families of those girls taking part in the squash programme have been able to move out of crowded camps to accommodation on the outskirts of Amman. At least in a small way, squash has proved a godsend for them and their children.

Sources

Thanks to The Gulf News, NAIJA Squash Media and The Daily Mail.

Note

You can find a French language article on Jordan’s Syrian Girl Refugee squash programme on the IP Reunion website.

London Squash: The Claridge Courts

Although the game of squash was invented in Britain, the first squash governing body in the world was founded, in 1904, in the United States. In fact, it was not until 1928 that an equivalent organisation, the Squash Racquets Association (SRA), was formed to agree standards for the game in Britain, including those for court size.

By that time, however, many squash courts had already been constructed which did not meet the new standard. Two of them were built in London during the period 1919 – 1921 to the same specification as the squash court on The Titanic which had sunk in 1912. The courts, known as The Claridge Courts, formed part of the premises of a service club in London’s Piccadilly.

They were to remain in use for almost a hundred years.

RAF Club, Piccadilly

The RAF Club

The Claridge Courts were seventeen inches narrower than the 1928 SRA standard. During their post-1928 lifetime, this feature was to add what has been described as “a certain measure of eccentricity” to the games played on them.

RAF Squash

The courts were located on the premises of the RAF Club, established in late 1918 for the use of members of the Royal Air Force. The RAF itself had been founded only on April 1st of the same year and was the first such national force in the world to become independent of army or navy control. The RAF Club’s buildings, still in use today, were acquired by the middle of 1919, their Piccadilly frontage being originally that of the Ladies Lyceum Club.

The RAF Club was officially opened by HRH The Duke of York in February 1922 and was visited the following month by Their Majesties King George V and Queen Mary. This association with the Royal Family continues to this day, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II being the Club’s Patron.

The Bath Cup

The Claridge Courts were amongst the first in London to host matches in the Bath Cup, the oldest squash league in the world. Established in 1922, the Cup was named after its founders, the Bath & Racquets Club, and is still one of the most prestigious squash competitions in Britain. The Cup is contested annually by the oldest clubs in London including: Queens, RAC, Hurlingham, Lansdowne, Roehampton, Oxford & Cambridge, MCC, Cumberland and Lloyd’s of London. The RAF Club has been represented in the competition since its inception, pausing temporarily in the early 1940s whilst its players were otherwise occupied in the Second World War.

Over the years the Claridge Courts have also been used for internal competition between Club members and their guests, as well as for inter-service competition with representatives of Britain’s other armed forces. The Club also has a long tradition of friendly competition with other London-based clubs such as Jesters, Escorts, Swans, Wine Traders, John Lewis, Old Wellingtonians and Civil Service, all of which have been able to experience the “eccentricity” of playing on The Claridge Courts.

The End Of An Era

Sadly, in 2016, a decision was taken to renovate the interior of the RAF Club in response to increasing demand for additional accommodation. One of the consequences of the decision was the removal of The Claridge Courts, marking the demise of two of the oldest squash courts in the world.

One of those campaigning to save the courts, Squadron Leader Philip Tilstone, a member for 30 years, said: “Whilst I understand the commercial reasons for the decision to close the courts I find it extremely disappointing that no other arrangements have been proposed.

“By representing the club in the prestigious Bath Cup league as well as in many friendly matches during the season, players have been able to educate many of our opponents on the way the military works and become better informed about the challenges faced by those in the commercial world.”

Sources

Thanks to the RAF Club, the Royal Air Force, Wikipedia, The Times, West End Extra and The London Evening Standard.