Teamwork

Watching this year’s European Team Squash Championships (ETC) prompted me to find out more about the competition and its global counterparts. Here’s the result.

Europe

The ETC is an annual competition for teams representing countries belonging to the European Squash Federation. Every year, men’s and women’s competitions are held at the same venue at the same time with this year’s event taking place at Edgbaston Priory in Birmingham, England.

England squad for the 2019 European Team Squash Championships: Left to right – James Willstrop, Sarah-Jane Perry, Tom Richards, Alison Waters, Declan James, Victoria Lust, Adrian Waller, Laura Massaro and Daryl Selby

Countries enter teams of four or five players to represent them in the women’s and men’s events respectively. In each round of the competition, teams face each other in best-of-four singles matches, points being scored both for rubbers and for  individual games won.

This year twenty-two countries entered teams with England beating Spain to win the men’s title and France beating England to take the women’s title.

England vs Spain – Men’s Final Highlights

World

The World Team Squash Championships (WTC) are also held annually although men’s and women’s competitions are biennial, taking place in alternate years and at different venues. This year, it’s the turn of the men to compete at the dramatically-named ‘Squash on Fire’ venue in Washington DC, USA. Last year, Egypt beat England in the final of the women’s competition held in Dalian, China. The 2020 women’s championship will be held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

England vs France – Women’s Final Highlights

The WTC is organised for teams representing countries belonging to the World Squash Federation. Countries enter teams of three or four players to represent them in the women’s and men’s events respectively. In each round of the competition, teams face each other in a best-of-three singles matches, points being scored both for rubbers and for individual  games won.

Asia

Last, but not least, the Asian Team Squash Championships (ATC) are held every two years, with men’s and women’s competitions being held at the same venue at the same time. In 2018, Hong Kong’s men’s and women’s teams both won their events, beating Pakistan and South Korea respectively. The championships were held in Cheongju, South Korea

The ATC is organised for teams representing countries belonging to the Asia Squash Federation. Countries enter teams of three or four players to represent them in the women’s and men’s events respectively. In each round of the competition, teams face each other in best-of-three singles matches, points being scored both for rubbers and for individual  games won.

Sources

Thanks to Wikipedia, England Squash, PSA Squash TV, Facebook and Squash On Fire.

Broken Strings (2018) – Short Film

What does it take before somebody’s resilience breaks? Sam Halford is tested when his coach pushes him and his classmate, Matt, to their limits. But when does pushing somebody beyond their limits become too much to handle?

Broken Strings (2018)

A Dunley Productions film.

Directed by Alfie Drakeley and Connor Dunham

Written by Alfie Drakeley

Cast: Jake Vermuelen (Sam Wilson) Josh Beardmore (Coach) and Alfie Drakeley (Matt Wilson).

Squash in Sixty Seconds

Take a look at the following two rallies, both taken from Canary Wharf Squash Classic matches played in London.

The first, taken from the 2016 tournament, is from a match between the eventual champion, France’s Mathieu Castagnet, and England’s Joe Lee. The second, from the 2019 tournament, also features its eventual winner, New Zealand’s Paul Coll, and England’s Tom Richards.

Neither rally lasts for much more than 60 seconds but both include a range of shots which could easily form the basis of a ‘how to play’ guide for beginners. If you take forehand and backhand shots separately, I counted over twenty types of shot played from the ‘T’, the front and back corners of the court, and mid-court. There are even back wall boasts and flying (attempted) volley-drops as a bonus.

Mathieu Castagnet vs Joe Lee (Canary Wharf Classic 2016)

Apart from the shots displayed, the ways in which the two rallies unfold lend themselves nicely to higher level analysis for learning and coaching purposes. For example, positioning, footwork, speed around the court and the sheer persistence needed to turn a losing position into a winning one are all on display. The need to retrieve is as important as the desire to dominate a rally.

Paul Coll vs Tom Richards (Canary Wharf Classic 2019)

And what about the value of the rallies in teaching markers or referees? Noticeably,there’s not a sign of an ‘out of court’ shot, a tinned shot, any body contact, or even a possible let or stroke. All players involved just get on with the game leaving the officials free to keep an eye open for anything which could affect their safety.

All that in two sixty-second snapshots. I never realised how easy it was.

Sources

Canary Wharf Classic video clips courtesy of PSA SquashTV .

Squash Coaching and Refereeing by R.B.Hawkey (1975) – Book Review

I can’t say I’ve ever had the opportunity to review a book on squash so when one came along I made like Peter Marshall and grabbed it with both hands. The volume in question, Dick Hawkey’s “Squash Coaching and Refereeing”, was gifted to me by a retired diplomat who, in a previous existence, had made his living selling antiquarian books. Knowing that I was an aficionado of the game he was certain that I would be  the best person to provide a home for the book, particularly as members of his family had started to pressurise him, for safety purposes, into reducing the mountains of memorabilia (‘junk’ in their terminology) hoarded in his one-bedroom flat.

“Squash Coaching and Refereeing” by R.B. Hawkey

The paperback book, originally published in 1975, is one of several written by R.B. (“Dick”) Hawkey who served as Director of Coaching at the UK’s Squash Racket Association in the 1960s and 70s. Most of them can still be obtained via archival  book services such as OpenLibrary and Alibris, and even from Amazon.

Split into separate ‘Coaching’ and ‘Refereeing sections, the overwhelming majority of the book’s content is as relevant today as when it was written almost 45 years ago. In fact, with the exception of references to the marking system (‘hand-in’ rather than ‘point-a-rally’ is mentioned throughout), the information, insights, advice and guidance presented are as clear and concise as any coach, marker or referee could want. I particularly liked Hawkey’s statement as to the purpose of coaching squash, i.e. to help players enjoy the game more. Having fun was clearly part of Hawkey’s approach to the game as was its social side, from watching matches, chatting with others (players and non-players alike) and drinking at the bar.

The purpose of refereeing, states Hawkey, is three-fold: to prevent injury; to prevent the “unpleasantly ruthless player” from having an unfair advantage; and, to ensure a “fair result” for every match. Safety, on-court manners and fairness are the watch-words.

On the subject of playing style, Hawkey is definitely not a purist. He observes that “virtually every player who has reached the top in any sport has his own idiosyncracies, his own pet shots, strokes of his own invention, things he can do that others cannot and shots he plays a little differently.”

“If,” he continues, “the correct and orthodox way were always the best for everyone, it would automatically follow that every champion was the perfect example of complete orthodoxy.” He goes on to name several great sporting champions (including Mohammed Ali) whose styles clearly disprove such a hypothesis. “In squash,” writes Hawkey, “the greatest of all time, hHashim Khan, was a complete novelty in the game. He held the racket nearly halfway up the shaft and as he raced around the court at unbelievable speed, he would improvise shots at will.”

In summary, Hawkey’s squash philosophy is based on enjoyment, sociability, safety, good manners, fairness and improvisation. Not a bad message to pass down through the generations.

Sources

Thanks to Wikipedia for entries on Peter Marshall and Hashim Khan.

Business Squash (Comedy Sketch)

Well “better late than never” I always say, or at least I occasionally say when I’ve fallen down on whatever job I’ve set myself; in this case spotting squash-themed comedy sketches.

This latest offering comes from Irish comedy trio Foil Arms and Hog who, for reasons unknown (to me, anyway) choose to omit a comma from their stage name, assuming that stage names still exist nowadays.

The group comprises Sean Finnegan, Sean Flanagan and Conor McKenna and performs on TV, radio, the stage and online. Formed in 2008 while all three were students at University College Dublin, the group’s name evolved from the nicknames each of the members had for each other; Foil (Sean Finegan) so-called because was the ‘comedy foil’, Arms (Conor McKenna) because he was ‘All arms and legs’ and Hog (Sean Flanagan) because he ostensibly hogged the limelight. All very well, but I’m still concerned about that comma.

And the “better late than never?” Ah, yes, well the sketch does date from 2013 but, in my defence, I’ve had a lot on recently.

P.S. Do check out the Foil Arms and Hog website for tour dates, merchandise and downloads.

Squash (2012) – Short Film / Cortomejadre

In Spanish. Click on video “Subtitles / Closed Captions” button for English subtitles.

It seems that, in modern times, destiny has reserved the same meeting place for us: the dole queue. A squash-themed story of competition, unemployment and dairy produce.

Parece que, con los tiempos que corren, el destino nos tiene guardado a todos un mismo lugar de encuentro: la cola del paro.

Distributed by the Instituto Del Cine, Spain 2012
  • Written and Directed by Jon Plazaola and Javier Cirujeda
  • Lead Producer: Guillermo Tio
  • Original Idea: Jon Plazaola
  • Associate Producer: Helher Escribano
  • Executive Producers: Guillermo Tio, Jon Plazaola and Javier Cirujeda
  • Director of Photography: Marco Caneda
  • Artistic Director: Carlos Perez De Irube
  • Music: The Dead Rocks “Easy Job”

How To Win A Squash Rally – Part 3

Hot on the heels of “How To Win A Squash Rally” and “How To Win A Squash Rally – Part 2” comes this offering from Mexico’s César Salazar. Well, perhaps “hot on the heels” is a little misleading as the two aforementioned posts appeared on this blog in 2016.

Salazar’s effort came in a first-round match against Number 2 seed Karim Abdel Gawad in the 2017 Hong Kong Open. The Mexican’s strategy can be summarised as follows:

1. Wrongly try to second-guess the direction of your opponent’s next shot and dive forward, full length, to return the ball.
2. Get to your feet.
3. Fall over your opponent’s leg and launch yourself horizontally towards the right-hand wall to return the ball.
4. Get up again.
5. Repeat step 1.
6. Return opponent’s next shot from a kneeling position.
7. Regain your footing.
8. Watch your opponent put the ball into the tin.

Classic.

Salazar went on to lose the match 3-1 to Gawad who eventually reached the semi-finals, going out to fellow Egyptian Ali Farag who, one assumes, upset Gawad’s rhythm by remaining on his feet through the entire 55 minute encounter.

It’s amazing what some players will do to win a rally.

Sources

Thanks to PSA Squash TV for the clip. You can find their YouTube channel here.

James Willstrop: Treading The Boards – Part 2

Some readers of this blog will remember that, in a previous post, I mentioned that former World Number 1 James Willstrop was, amongst other things, a dramatic actor. Since then, it’s been pointed out to me that two of the ‘other things’ may be of interest to the curious, not to say obsessive, squash fan.

Author

First up is Willstrop’s 2012 well-received autobiography “A Shot and a Ghost.” Unlike most ghost-written ‘in my own words’ sports ‘autobiographies’, Willstrop’s book was actually written by Willstrop and, therefore, really is an autobiography and a very personal one at that. It was journalist Rod Gilmour who originally approached Willstrop offering his services as ghost-writer, an action which possibly helped to motivate the latter to go it alone as an author.

Motivational Speaker

Second up, perhaps not surprisingly, is Willstrop’s role as a motivational speaker in the ‘up-and-coming and can’t-get-away-from-it’ field of personal development. As readers of “A Shot and a Ghost” will recognise, becoming an elite sports champion requires the ability to set and realise goals, overcome adversity, develop a winning mindset and adapt to changes in the competitive environment. No wonder sports metaphors play well in the world of business and management ‘role modelling.’

Artist

Third up. OK, this one is a bit of a stretch. We’ve already addressed James Willstrop’s off-court identities as an actor, an author and a motivational speaker. But what about the small matter of artistry on the squash court.

I don’t know about you, but I think that Willstrop’s execution of the “Triple Fake” or “Windmill” shot is, to all intents and purposes, performance art. See what you think and spare a thought for Willstrop’s opponent, Karim Abdel Gawad, in the quarter-final of 2018’s Grasshopper Cup in Zurich.

The rally leading up to Willstrop’s winning shot wasn’t bad either…

Sources

Thanks to the Daily Telegraph for Rod Gilmour’s review of “A Shot and a Ghost” and PSA Squash TV for the clip.

Monday Night (2011) – Short Film

A short film about appalling behaviour.

Cast

Larry Day and Bruce Dinsmore as The Players

Credits

A film by Karl Raudsapp-Hearne

Funded by Bravo! FACT

Presented by Pulsing Calf Pictures

Written, Directed and Produced by Karl R. Hearne

****

“Monday Night” isn’t the first squash-themed short film to serve as a cypher for dubious behaviour in business and, I suspect, it won’t be the last. As a case in point, French director Lionel Bailliu’s 2003 film Squash showed two business rivals involved in on-court combat of the “fight to the death” variety.

In contrast, Karl Raudsapp-Hearne’s 2011 film contrasts on-court etiquette (or lack of it in the case of Larry Day’s self-destructive player) with off-court subterfuge, both opponents happy to plot against a new colleague to further their own financial ends.

“I guess that’s the game,” says Day’s character at the death.

For some players, I suspect that’s just what it is.

 

 

Squash and The Asian Games

During my visit to the Punjab Squash Complex in Lahore, I was reminded that the start of the 2018 Asian Games, including squash, was only a few weeks away. Held in Jakarta, the Games were to include players from 18 countries, the largest number ever to take part in the four competitions to be contested. Unlike the Commonwealth Games held earlier in the year on Australia’s Gold Coast, the Asian Games would not include doubles events in addition to men’s and women’s singles competitions. However, men’s and women’s team competitions would be included for a third time following their introduction in Guangzhou in 2010.

The first appearance of squash at the Asian Games took place in 1998 when Pakistan took gold and silver in the men’s singles, Zarak Jahan Khan beating Amjad Khan. Four years later, in Busan, Pakistan’s Mansoor Zaman and Shahid Zaman took silver and bronze respectively, the gold going to Malaysia’s Ong Beng Hee. In Doha, in 2006, Pakistan’s men’s singles medal haul continued with Mansoor this time taking bronze along with, for the first time, an Indian player, the evergreen Saurav Ghosal. In 2010, in Guangzhou, Ghosal was to take bronze again with Pakistan’s Aamir Atlas Khan taking silver.

Dipika Pallikal and Nicol David in the 2018 Women’s Singles Semi-final

In one way, 2010 was to prove a turning point for squash in the sub-continent with the first medals for women players with India, including Dipika Pallikal and Joshna Chinappa, taking bronze in the team event. In the first ever men’s team competition, there was also to be success for the men with Pakistan taking gold and India, Saurav Ghosal included, taking bronze.

Four years later, Pallikal, Chinappa and Ghosal were again to appear amongst the medal winners in Incheon. India’s women took silver in the team event with its men’s team winning gold for the first time in any Games squash competition. Pallikal was to take bronze in the women’s singles, the first ever singles medal for a female player from the sub-continent.

Dipika Pallikal and Joshna Cinappa at the 2018 Asian Games

And so to 2018, with singles bronze medals for three Indian players, Saurav Ghosal, Dipika Pallikal and Joshna Chinappa. In the team competitions, India’s men failed to repeat their gold medal success of 2014, taking bronze after losing to eventual silver medallists Hong Kong in the semi-finals. Pakistan’s men also had to settle for bronze, losing to eventual gold medallists, Malaysia. In the women’s team competition, India went one better than the men, winning through to the final before succumbing to Hong Kong.

So where does that leave India and Pakistan in terms of the two countries’ all-time Asian Games medals haul? India have now won thirteen medals (one gold, three silver and nine bronze) and Pakistan eight (two gold, three silver and three bronze).

Nicol David after beating Subramaniam Sivasangari

But, after 2018’s Games, the largest hauls belong to Hong Kong with 17 medals and, perhaps unsurprisingly, Malaysia with 26. There are, after all, advantages in having 9-times medallist Nicol David in your squad.

Sources

Thanks to Squash Info, Malaysiakini, The Hindustan Times, The Indian Express, The Free Press Journal and Wikipedia.